‘Post-truth’ reaches the Homelessness Crisis

‘Post-truth’ reaches the homelessness crisis
When is an “alternative fact” a fact? When it’s uttered by powerful people in pivotal public positions. Statements on the housing and homelessness crises made by people such as Leo Varadkar(1), Conor Skehan(2) and Eileen Gleeson(3) in recent days shows us that clearly untrue statements are presumed, by those stating them, to be accepted and swallowed whole by a docile and acquiescing populace.
We could offer a plethora of actual facts here based on studies both nationally and internationally showing that we do indeed have a housing crisis, we do indeed have a homelessness crisis, we do indeed need immediate and colossal investment in social housing, we do indeed need immediate rent controls, we do indeed need a moratorium on evictions….but we won’t. These facts are out there in the public domain for everyone (including those powerful people in pivotal public positions), to read.
Instead we are going to say this;
WE.ARE.ANGRY. VERY.VERY.ANGRY.
And you should be too.
We are social workers, we are people working in the human professions, we are service users. We know there is a homelessness crisis. We are living it and seeing it every single day. We have for years. We saw this coming. We shouted. They ignored. We know there is a housing crisis. We are living it and seeing it every single day. We saw this coming. We shouted. They ignored. We know that there is a generation of young people whose futures are being destroyed because of these crises. We are living it and seeing it every single day. We saw this coming. We shouted. They ignored. We know there are thousands of children and young people whose mental health is suffering and whose mental health will suffer for years to come because of these crises. We are living it and seeing it every single day. We saw this coming. We shouted. They ignored. We know there are thousands of people staying in unsafe and potentially dangerous situations e.g. domestic violence relationships; children and young people in psychologically, sexually, emotionally, physically abusive situations, because of these crises. We are living it and seeing it every single day. We saw this coming. We shouted. They ignored.
Our Demands

  1. We are calling for the immediate removal of Mr. Skehan from his position as chair of the Housing Agency. To have someone with such a blatant disregard for people as Mr. Skehan in this position is unacceptable. The callousness he has shown in his statements towards people in poverty and people experiencing homelessness is quite shocking. In this regard we in SWAN Ireland have no faith that the Housing Agency’s agenda is fair and unbiased and are concerned about the future development of housing policy in this regard. We are also very concerned about how the housing needs of other marginalised populations such as those with mental health difficulties, learning disabilities or people from ethnic minority communities for example, might be viewed by an Agency led by someone like Mr. Skehan.
  2. We are also calling for the immediate retraction of remarks made by Mr. Skehan in media reports in recent days(4) and months(5) along with a clear and forthright apology.
  3. We call on Mr. Varadkar to retract his statements in recent days(6,7), concerning his repeated quotes of inaccurate information regarding the homelessness crisis. We call on Mr. Varadkar to issue a statement outlining the actual facts regarding the homelessness crisis in the country and to use current statistics to reflect this.
  4. We call for the immediate removal of Ms. Gleeson from her position in the Dublin Regional Homelessness Executive (DRHE). We in SWAN Ireland have no faith that the DRHE’s agenda is fair and unbiased and are concerned about the manner in which the DHRE will implement its statutory duties in light of the appalling comments made by the Executive’s Director in recent days(8). We are also very concerned about how the needs of other marginalised populations who may need to access homelessness services, such as those with mental health difficulties, learning disabilities or people from ethnic minority communities for example, might be viewed by an Agency led by someone like Ms. Gleeson.
  5. We are also calling for the immediate retraction of the remarks made by Ms. Gleeson in media reports in recent days along with a clear and forthright apology.

We ask that all of our supporters and members call for these demands too. Please email your TD’s, post this on your social media accounts, ask your friends and family to act too. We aren’t asking for anything radical, just that people, all people, are treated with dignity and that our public representatives treat us with respect when it comes to offering us factual information.
Yours in solidarity,
The SWAN Ireland Steering Committee

  1. http://www.thejournal.ie/leo-varadkar-homelessness-3691835-Nov2017/
  2. http://www.thejournal.ie/homelessness-normal-conor-skehan-3693850-Nov2017/
  3. https://www.irishtimes.com/news/ireland/irish-news/volunteers-giving-only-food-to-homeless-not-helpful-official-says-1.3292063
  4. http://www.thejournal.ie/homelessness-normal-conor-skehan-3693850-Nov2017/
  5. http://www.thejournal.ie/conor-skehan-housing-agency-ireland-2-3656223-Oct2017/
  6. https://www.google.ie/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=6&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwiiov-7vrzXAhWKPRoKHSuMCtoQFghDMAU&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.irishexaminer.com%2Fbreakingnews%2Fireland%2Fleo-varadkar-claims-irelands-homelessness-levels-are-low-by-international-standards-813706.html&usg=AOvVaw3bfGpkT2vULENVAnoG1D2k
  7. https://www.google.ie/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=7&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwiiov-7vrzXAhWKPRoKHSuMCtoQFghGMAY&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.independent.ie%2Firish-news%2Fpolitics%2Ftaoiseach-insists-ireland-has-one-of-the-lowest-levels-of-homelessness-36310203.html&usg=AOvVaw2q9Z0LY0nViMLLJ_9zqNGm
  8. http://www.thejournal.ie/eileen-gleeson-homeless-3699069-Nov2017/
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Global Letter of Protest

AN OPEN LETTER OF PROTEST TO THE CO-CHAIRS OF THE SCIENTIFIC/ORGANISING COMMITTEE (IFSW/IASSW/ICSW BI-ANNUAL WORLD SOCIAL WORK CONFERENCE TO BE HELD IN DUBLIN 4-7 JULY 2018)

“We welcome the global social work conference to take place during summer, 2018. This is a very important conference and it is great that it is hosted in Dublin, giving us an opportunity to discuss, learn and network.

However, we are deeply concerned about the registration fee being imposed. A fee of between €575 and €775 is far too high and does not even include the cost of accommodation. In Dublin, this is presently on average in excess of €130 each night. Travel costs are also excluded.

The fee reflects neoliberal values and not the more progressive values of social work. Service users, students, retired practitioners and current practitioners simply cannot afford these costs. Neither can many academics, including those retired. The event risks becoming an elitist showcase gathering for the privileged.

We are also concerned about the way the inflated costs exclude those based in ‘austerity’ hit countries such as Greece, and further afield, in the Global South. Colleagues from low income countries with rising levels of inequality and budget cuts will be entirely excluded because of the fees, accommodation and travel costs; similarly, many in Ireland are still suffering from hardships because of the bail out of the banks and continuing ‘austerity’. The homeless numbers are also rising daily. As social workers we constantly deal with the consequences of social inequalities. The conference, its costs, values and politics must reflect all of these issues.

We are, therefore, calling on the Scientific Committee and associated conference organisers to immediately and substantially reduce the registration fee in order to make the event more inclusive”.

7 November 2017

Signed by

Dr Somaya Abdullah, University of Cape Town, South Africa

Hakan Acar, Liverpool Hope University, England & (in a personal capacity) executive member European Association of Schools of Social Work

Donna Baines, Chair and Professor, Social Work and Policy Studies, University of Australia, Sydney, NSW Australia

Neil Ballantyne, Senior Lecturer in Social Work, School of Health and Social Sciences, The Open Polytechnic of New Zealand

Professor Sarah Banks, Durham University, UK

Dawn Belkin Martinez, PhD, LICSW, Clinical Associate Professor, Boston University School of Social Work, Boston Liberation Health Group, USA

Professor Peter Beresford, Shaping Our Lives & University of Essex, England Rupaleem Bhuyan, PHD, Associate Professor, University of Toronto, Canada

Christine Black-Hughes Ph.D., LICSW, Minnesota State University, Mankato, South Africa Dr Pieter J Boshoff, North-West University (Potchefstroom Campus), South Africa.

Prof Petro Botha, Associate Professor, UNISA, South Africa

Kathy Boxall, Professor of Social Work and Disability Studies, Edith Cowan University, Western, Australia

Mr. Nngodiseni Jimmy Budeli, University of Venda, South Africa

Professor Ian Butler, FAcSS, Honorary Professor, University of Exeter, England

Jorge Calbucura, Associate Professor of Sociology, Department of Social Work, Mid Sweden University, Sweden

Melisa Campana PhD, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Argentina

Ben Carniol, Professor Emeritus, Ryerson University (Toronto), and Scholar-in-Residence, Indigenous Field of Study, Faculty of Social Work, Laurier University (Kitchener, Ontario), Canada

Borja Castro-Serrano, Faculty member, Social Sciences and Humanities Faculty, School of Social Work, Universidad Andrés Bello, Chile

Chris Chapman, PhD, Associate Professor, School of Social Work, York University, Canada

Dr Clement Chihota, Social Work Educator, Bethlehem Tertiary Institute, New Zealand

Dominic Chilvers, Social Work Educator, Bethlehem Tertiary Institute, Member of Aotearoa New Zealand Association of Social Workers, New Zealand

Marcia B. Cohen, Ph.D, Professor Emeritus, University of New England, School of Social Work, USA

Lynda Coley, Educator/fieldwork Placement Coordinator, Bethlehem Tertiary Institute, Aotearoa New Zealand

Emer Conneely, Social Worker, Social Work Action Network (SWAN) Galway, Republic of Ireland

Miriam Conry, Social Worker, Social Work Action Network (SWAN) Galway, Republic of Ireland

Lesley Cooper, Professor of Social Work, University of Wollongong 2500, NSW, Australia

Dr. Shirley E. Cox, ACSW/LCSW, Professor Emeritus, Brigham Young University, School of Social Work, USA

Dr Ian Cummins, Senior Lecturer in Social Work, University of Salford, England Sofia Dedotsi, Senior Lecturer, Northumbria University, United Kingdom

Filipe Duarte, PhD candidate, Carleton University, School of Social Work, Canada

Dr Glynnis Dykes, Deputy Head of Department (Social Work), University of the Western Cape, South Africa

Dr. Griffin Epstein, Professor of Social Service Work, George Brown College, Canada Ms Merlene Esau, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa

Diane S. Falk, Professor of Social Work, Stockton University, USA

Professor Brid Featherstone, Head of Department (Behavioural and Social Sciences), University of Huddersfield, UK

Iain Ferguson, Honorary Professor of Social Work and Social Policy, University of the West of Scotland, Scotland

Dr Sandra B. Ferreira, Head of the Department (Social Work), University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa

Jorge Arturo Sáenz Fonseca, Presidente Junta Directiva, Colegio de Trabajadores Sociales de Costa Rica

Birgitta Forsberg, Lecturer in Social Work, Department of Social Work, Mid Sweden University, Sweden

Dr Rachel Fyson, Associate Professor, University of Nottingham, UK

Dr Paul Michael Garrett, NUI Galway & member of Social Work Action Network (SWAN) Republic of Ireland

Scott Grant, Lecturer in Social Work, Glasgow Caledonian University, Scotland

Professor Mel Gray, School of Humanities and Social Science, University of Newcastle, Australia

Surinder Guru, Lecturer, University of Birmingham, Country, England Dr. Hefin Gwilym, Lecturer in Social Policy, Bangor University, Wales Dr Neil Henderson, University of the Western Cape, South Africa

Marcus Herz, Associate Professor, Department of Social Work, Malmö University, Sweden

Dr. Dorothee Holscher, UKZN, Durban, South Africa

Mary Hurley, Lecturer, School of Applied Social Studies, University College Cork, Republic of Ireland

Professor Jim Ife, Professor Social Work, School of Social Sciences and Psychology, Western Sydney University, Australia

Magnus Israelsson PhD Senior Lecturer, Department of Social Work, Mid-Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden

Jessica H. Jönsson, PhD, Senior lecturer, Department of Social Work, Mid Sweden University, Sweden

Angelika Kaffrell-Lindahl, Lecturer in Social Work, Dep. of Social Work, Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden

Masoud Kamali, Professor, PhD, Mid Sweden University, Sweden

Dr. Emily Keddell, Senior Lecturer, Department of Sociology, Gender and Social Work University of Otago – Te Whare Wananga o Otago, Dunedin, Aotearoa New Zealand

Dr Anneline Keet, Nelson Mandela University, Port Elizabeth, South Africa

Dr. Christine Labonté-Roset, Alice-Salomon University, Berlin, Germany

Kin-Kwok LAI, Senior Lecturer Caritas Institute of Higher Education, Hong Kong

Marcus Lauri, Ph.D. Political Science, Department of Social Work, Mid Sweden University, Sweden

Professor Michael Lavalette, Professor of Social Work and Social Policy, Department of Social Work, Care and Justice, Liverpool Hope University & Social Work Action Network (SWAN), UK

Dr. Vesna Leskošek, Associate Professor, Faculty of Social Work, Ljubljana, Slovenia Prof. Bogdan Lešnik, University of Ljubljana Faculty of Social Work, Slovenia Michelle Lefevre, Professor of Social Work, University of Sussex, England

Professor Marcel Londt, Head of Social Work, University of the Western Cape, South Africa Professor Walter Lorenz, formerly Free University of Bolzano, Italy

Karen H. Lyons, PhD, CQSW, Emeritus Professor, International Social Work, London Metropolitan University, England

Dr Reima Ana Maglajlic, University of Sussex, UK

Professor JC Makhubele, University of Limpopo, South Africa Professor MDM Makofane, Unisa, South Africa

Dr Tish Marrable, Senior Lecturer in Social Work, Department of Social Work & Social Care, University of Sussex, England

Dr Mbazima Mathebani, UNISA, South Africa

Kgosietsile Maripe, University of Botswana, South Africa Natalia Hernández Mary, Universidad Alberto Hurtado, Chile

Day Marira, Student, Social Work Action Network (SWAN), Galway, Republic of Ireland

Kali Marsh, Community Counsellor, Early Intervention Progam, Central Toronto Youth Services, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Dra. Leticia Arancibia Martínez, Teacher and Researcher, School of Social Work Escuela de Trabajo social, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Chile

Dr Poppy Masinga, Lecturer, University of Pretoria, South Africa

Dr Francine Masson, Lecturer, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa

Tatiana Matulayová, Associated Professor & Head of Department, Sts Cyril and Methodius Faculty of Theology, Palacký University, Olomouc, Czech Republic

Roslyn McConnell, Social Worker, Social Work Action Network (SWAN) Galway, Republic of Ireland

David McKendrick, Lecturer in Social Work, Glasgow Caledonian University, Scotland

Dr Kenneth McLaughlin, Senior Lecturer, Manchester Metropolitan University, England

Jane McPherson, PhD, MPH, LCSW, Director of Global Engagement & Assistant Professor, School of Social Work, Faculty Fellow, Center for Social Justice, Human and Civil Rights, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA

Carolina Muñoz Mendoza. Investigadora predoctoral, Instituto de Gobierno y Políticas Públicas (IGOP), Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona, Catalunya-España

Goutham M. Menon, Ph.D, Dean & Professor, Loyola University Chicago, School of Social Work, USA

Dr. L.D. Mogorosi, University of Venda, South Africa

Christine Morley, Associate Professor/Head of Social Work & Human Services, Queensland University of Technology, Australia

Gianinna Munoz-Arce, Senior Lecturer, Alberto Hurtado University, Chile

Liesbeth Naessens, lecturer and researcher, University College Odisee, Brussels, Belgium

Ana Ngamoki, Senior Advisor, Rehabilitation Programmes and Interventions, Department of Corrections/ Ara Poutama Aotearoa, Wellington, Aotearoa New Zealand

Cristian Leyton Navarro, Researcher, Latin American Center for Rural Development, Chile

Vibeke Bak Nielsen, Social Worker, Phd. Researcher & Educator, Aalborg University, Sociology and Social Work, Denmark

Carolyn Noble, PhD, Associate Dean (Social Work), ACAP, Sydney, Australia Sybille Nonninger, Grundsatzreferentin, Landesjugendamt Mainz, Germany

Gorana Panić, doctoral student, University of Jyväskylä, Finland/Bosnia-Hertzegovina

Manohar Pawar, PhD, Professor of Social Work and President, ICSD Member, Institute for Land, Water and Society School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Charles Sturt University Wagga Wagga, NSW, Australia

Dr Donna Peach, Lecturer in Social Work, University of Salford, England

Professor Bob Pease, Honorary Professor, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Deakin University and Adjunct Professor, Institute for the Study of Social Change, University of Tasmania, Australia

Maria Pentaraki, Queens University Belfast & Social Work Action Network (SWAN) Northern Ireland

Nevashnee Perumal, Lecturer, Nelson Mandela University, Port Elizabeth, South Africa  Dr Roshini Pillay, Lecturer, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa Pia Ringø, PhD, Assistant professor, Departement of Sociology and Social Work, Denmark

Jennifer M. Poole, MSW, PhD, Graduate Program Director and Associate Professor, School of Social Work, Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada

Dr Edmarie Pretorius, Head, Social Work, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa

Laura Racovita-Szilagyi, PhD, MSW, Southern Adventist University, Collegedale, TN, 37315 USA

Niina Rantamäki, Project Researcher, University of Jyväskylä, Kokkola University Consortium Chydenius, Finland

Angie Raphalalani, Practicum HUB Administrator, South Africa

Dr John Victor Rautenbach, Head of Department & Senior Lecturer, Department of Social Work and Social Development, University of Fort Hare, South Africa

Michael Reisch, Ph.D., MSW, Daniel Thursz Distinguished Professor of Social Justice School of Social Work, University of Maryland, USA

Taly Reininger, Assistant Professor, Universidad Andres Bello, Chile

Nol Reverda, Professor of Social Work, Zuyd University of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Social Studies, Netherlands

Prof. Dr. Griet Roets, Department of Social Work and Social Pedagogy, Ghent University, Belgium

Dr. Steve Rogowski, Social Worker, Work Action Network/Labour Party, England

Rudi Roose, Prof. of Social Work, Department of Social Work and Social Pedagogy, Ghent University, Belgium

Cláudia Mônica dos Santos, Social Work, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Brasil

Lydia Sapouna, College Lecturer, School of Applied Social Studies. University College Cork, Republic of Ireland

Méabh Savage, Lecturer in Social Care, Waterford Institute of Technology, Republic of Ireland

Professor Catharina Schenk, University of the Western Cape, South Africa

Mohd Shahid, Professor of Social Work, Maulana Azad National Urdu University, Hyderabad, India

Graeme Simpson, Senior Lecturer in Social Work, University of Wolverhampton, England Dr Gurnam Singh, Principal Lecturer in Social Work, Coventry University, UK

Dr Linda Smith, Lecturer, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, Scotland Roger Smith, Professor of Social Work, Durham, England

Dr Tony Stanley, Chief Social Worker & Assistant Director, Birmingham City Council/Birmingham Children’s Trust, England

Pedro Gabriel Silva, Assistant Professor, University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro Portugal

Dr Ilze Slabbert, Stellenbosch University, South Africa

Prof. Silvia Staub-Bernasconi, Technical University Berlin/Alice-Salomon University of Applied Sciences Berlin, Germany/Switzerland

Dr Paul Stepney, Adj. Professor of Social Work, 33014 University of Tampere, Finland Dr Marianne Strydom, Stellenbosch University, South Africa

Professor Pius T. Tanga, University of Fort Hare, South Africa

Dr. Sonia M. Tascón, Lecturer, Social Work and Community Welfare Western Sydney University Sydney, Australia

Dimitra – Dora Teloni, Associate Professor, Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Department of Social Work, Greece

Prof Adrian D. van Breda, University of Johannesburg & and President of the Association of South African Social Work Education Institutions, South Africa

Juan Saavedra Vásquez, School of Social Work, Universidad del Bío-Bío, Chile

Paula Vidal Molina PhD, Professor Asistent, Coordinadora Núcleo de Investigación y Desarrollo Estado, Ciudadanìa y Democracia. Trabajo Sociall/ University of Chile, Faculty of Social Sciences (Social Work), Chile

Jijian Voronka, PhD, Assistant Professor, School of Social Work, University of Windsor, Canada

Tanya Voss, Assistant Dean for Field Education, Steve Hicks School of Social Work, The University of Texas at Austin, United States

Frank T.Y. Wang, Professor, Graduate Institute of Social Work, National Chengchi University, Taiwan

Bill Whitaker, Professor Emeritus, Boise State University, Oregon, USA Elizabeth Whitmore, Professor Emerita, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada

Olivia Brosnan Williams, Social Worker & Social Work Action Network (SWAN), Galway, Republic of Ireland

Professor Charlotte Williams, RMIT, Melbourne, Australia

Welfare Words – New Book by Paul Michael Garrett

WELFARE WORDS’ AND SOCIAL WORK

welfare words

BUY IT HERE:  https://www.eassw.org/welfare-words-and-social-work-paul-garrett/

Why is it important for social workers and social work educators to think more critically about the words used in practice? This was the question I posed in my keynote paper given at the EASSW conference in Paris in June. In my new my new book Welfare Words I try to answer this question by looking at a cluster of words and phrases amplifying the ‘state of play’ within the fields of social work and social policy during a period of faltering neoliberalism.

Welfare Words examines how power relations operate through the language and culture, encouraging readers to

  • question how welfare words fit within a wider economic and cultural context riven with gross social inequalities.
  • disrupt taken-for-granted meanings within mainstream social work and social policy.
  • think more deeply, critically and politically about the incessant, often unreflective, usage of specific words and phrases.

The words and phrases explored include: Welfare Dependency; Underclass; Social In/Exclusion; Early Intervention; Resilience; Care; Adoption. Welfare Words draws, therefore, on a range of European theorists to aid readers’ critical engagement.

Concentrating on words such as these and locating them within an economic and social context, may help us to punctuate dominant and taken-for-granted narratives which are central to neoliberalism within and beyond our profession.

I also hope that the ‘Reflection and Talk Boxes’ at the end of each chapter will spark and stimulate critical conversations in both classrooms and workplaces.

Paul Michael Garrett, NUI Galway, Republic of Ireland

Frontline Issue 4 Summer 2017

Pages from Frontline 4 Summer 2017

Here it is! Hot off the press, Frontline Issue 4 Summer 2017. Enjoy reading it and please share it and let us know your thoughts! As always, we are keen to get submissions for all future editions of the bulletin so don’t hesitate to get in touch to discuss any ideas you have.

 

Thanks, The SWAN Ireland Frontline Editorial team

 

Link to bulletin: Frontline 4 Summer 2017

Support needed for National Housing Demonstration

Please see the following request from our colleagues in the Irish Housing Network. Get involved if you can!

“From 13 families on the street last week to deteriorating conditions in hostels, it’s clear the homeless and housing crisis is only getting worse. Proposals to move families to warehouses such as Bargaintown, rising rents and more evictions are only the start of a worsening crisis. Inner City Helping Homeless have called for a national homeless demonstration on the 17th of June, supported so far by the Irish Housing Network and open to all groups to support. As the crisis gets worse, it is time to start working together. The 17th is only the beginning.

https://www.facebook.com/events/1860106834239026/

Get Involved
We need your help to organise and promote the national demo. On Thursday the 8th June, at 7pm we will have a public meeting, with information on how to get involved. It will be in Lloyds Bar, Amiens Street. Detail are here:

https://www.facebook.com/events/1871031916496682

Otherwise Please contact National Homeless Demonstration on facebook, Irish Housing Network or Inner City Homeless or email Homelessdemo@protonmail.com or outreach.ihn@gmail.com to get involved

We need help recruiting volunteers , contacting groups around the country, leafleting, postering, door knocking and setting up stalls. social media and media promotion and organising the logistics for the day such PA, Stewards etc.

Our Demands
There are immediate issues that have be dealt in Emergency accommodation to tackle the terrible conditions and horrible mistreatment of residents.

Emergency accommodation Independent review: Independent human rights and care review of all from private to charity and state run
Emergency Accommodation, as a center of care: 24hr access, Fully funded response team & wrap around supports centering mental health, security and privacy for all residents, full and enforceable complaint procedures implemented.
No to Family Hubs. Warehousing families is not a solution. Homes not hubs

We need to tackle the causes of homeless and the wider housing crisis

No evictions and security of tenure Private Rental Market: No Economic Evictions. Security of Tenure and affordable rents for all
Build and Buy Social housing: Build social housing for all. Usage of 183,000 empty houses as social housing. Buy portfolios from NAMA.
Mortgages Write down. On negative equity for those in mortgage distress in their single family home”.

Thank you,

The IHN Outreach team

 

 

 

 

 

 

Call for Papers for SWAN UK conference

Call for papers

‘DEFENDING WELFARE, WELCOMING REFUGEES: ANOTHER SOCIAL WORK IS POSSIBLE’

2017’s conference is the 8th and 9th of April. The key themes for this year will be refugees and racism; welfare reform; anti-privatisation and international perspectives.

 

The Social Work Action Network (SWAN) is a radical, campaigning organisation of social work and social care practitioners, students, service users, carers and academics, united by our concern that social work practice is being undermined by managerialism and marketisation, by the stigmatisation of service users and by welfare cuts and restrictions.

 

The SWAN conference is the largest annual radical and critical Social Work conference in Europe with over a decade of bringing together educators, service users, practitioners and all those concerned with social work and social justice. Previous presentations have included leading journalists and campaigners, veterans of struggles such as the miners dispute and service user led organisations, in addition to leading academics and thinkers in this field.

 

This year’s conference will take place in Middlesbrough in North East England. Over half of Middlesbrough is made up of areas that are the most deprived in England. Additionally Middlesbrough has the highest proportion of resident asylum seekers and refugees in the UK . The challenges of practicing from a social justice perspective, in such areas of multiple deprivations, form a central focus of the conference.

 

We welcome presentations (20 mins) or more interactive workshops (60 mins) from ALL, including practitioners, service user and social justice organisations, students, educators and trade unionists.

 

We are honoured this year to work alongside The Other Perspective, a refugee social enterprise, who will share a meal with us on Saturday evening in the student union, and provide the catering. Given the heavy involvement of Swan in anti-racism campaigning and social work in Calais over the past 18 months, this is a fitting partnership.

 

The conference will be held at the School of Health and Social Care at Teesside University, and there is ample parking on site for cars and coaches. There are lots of hotels and B+B options to suit most budgets in the local area (Travel Lodge/Jurys Inn etc.), and the campus is an approx. 11 minute walk from the train station. Regional airports include Durham Tees valley (20 mins) and Newcastle (60 mins). National rail links are good and Middlesbrough is approximately 3.5 hours from London or Edinburgh by train.

http://www.tees.ac.uk/sections/about/visiting/middlesbrough_region.cfm

 

SWAN keep the cost of this conference as low as possible. Tickets can be purchased here and range from £15 to £35 for the full weekend, including Saturday’s meal.  Asylum seekers and refugees attend for FREE.

Address for proposals:

Please send proposals of no more than 300 words to swanconference2017@gmail.com. All proposals will be responded to by 12 March 2017 or sooner. See you in Teeside!

Social Work Action Network and Home Sweet Home

Hi all,

As you all must be aware, Home Sweet Home launched a superb action to highlight the serious inadequacy of the government response to the now out of control homelessness issue here in Ireland. Since it began it’s action, Home Sweet Home (HSH), which includes membership from Irish Housing Network (IHN), the Artists and Trade Unionists, and a huge number of volunteers, has provided a range of vital supports and services to residents of Apollo House, and through it’s partnership with the PeterMcVerryTrust also. HSH has also been providing support through it’s outreach service, to those who are forced to sleep rough in Dublin city, due to the continued lack of suitable and affordable housing options.

SWAN Ireland is a member of the IHN and some of our members have been busy volunteering with this action, or helping behind the scenes. If you have been involved with Apollo House in any way, we’d love to hear from you! Please email us at socialworkactionnetworkireland@gmail.com, or PM us on facebook as we’d love to hear about your experiences and try and liaise with you about Home Sweet Home and about any other future actions. We want to build the SWAN Ireland movement, so that we can ensure that the values of  partnership, empowerment and social justice are to the forefront of all care work.  We look forward to hearing from you!